Saturday, December 31, 2011

Happy New Year

Wishing you have a safe celebration welcoming 2012.

Join us at 10am January 1 for mass celebrating the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus Christ. Occurring on the eighth day of Christmas, the feast commemorates Jesus' circumcision. While the feast is not among the higher profile ones in the church year, the circumcision of Jesus inspires among the best-loved words in the Book of Common Prayer, the Song of Simeon.

Seeing Joseph and Mary bring Jesus into the temple, Simeon, who had been promised he would not die before seeing the messiah, "took him into his arms and praised God, saying, 'Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace, according to your word; for my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and for glory to your people Israel.'" (Luke 2:28-32)

Friday, December 30, 2011

A Thank You Message from the Priest in Charge


Thanks to all who emptied out their pockets and found their checkbooks to replenish the Discretionary fund. As a result, crises were avoided and empty refrigerators were filled. The mandate—feed my people and care for the distressed—was profoundly addressed. Peace, to your concerned hearts.  

To Paul Greatbatch, who has brought his amazing ability to produce beauty on the Web and the printed page, who has quietly ordered the administrative work of the parish and offered his talents and concerns many times—thank you. You will be missed. And each time we encounter the need to find creative approaches to issues and to presentations appropriate to this place, we will remember with gratitude your time here.

To all who were involved in creating two very meaningful services to honor the birth of Jesus, those who attended those offerings and participated in the joy of those occasions, those who made sure all shut-ins and others who came to our doors in need were served, those who gave food for the weary in so many wayssoul and body—thank you for extending your time and talents. 
 
See you Sunday as we celebrate the power of the name—His and ours.  

Peace,
Tanya+

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Indianapolis Men's Chorus Pictures

The Indianapolis Men's Chorus played to an overflowing crowd in our beautiful acoustic space on Sunday, December 18! Thanks to Tim Jensen for the photos.





Upcoming Services and Events


CHRISTMAS EVE
Saturday, December 24 
Bach Prelude, 10:30 PM
Midnight Mass, 11:00 PM


CHRISTMAS DAY
Sunday, December 25 
Low Mass with Carols, 10:00AM


THE FEAST OF THE HOLY NAME
Sunday January 1
Solemn Mass, 10:00AM


THE EPIPHANY
Friday, January 6 
Solemn Mass, 6:30PM
Light Supper to Follow


BISHOP'S VISITATION and FORUM
Sunday, January 8
Solemn Mass with Baptism, 10:00AM


ANNUAL MEETING
Sunday, January 29
Parish Hall, 11:30 AM





From the Priest-in-Charge


HOPE

The kind of hope I often think about is, I believe, a state of mind, not a state of the world. Either we have hope within us or we don't. Hope is not a prognostication—it's an orientation of the spirit. Each of us must find real, fundamental hope within himself. You can't delegate that to anyone else. Hope in this deep and powerful sense is not the same as joy when things are going well, headed for early success, but rather an ability to work for something to succeed. Hope is definitely not the same thing as optimism. It's not the conviction that something will turn out well, but the certainty that something makes sense, regardless of how it turns out. It is this hope, above all, that gives us strength to live and to continually try new things, even in conditions that seem as hopeless as ours do, here and now. In the face of this absurdity, life is too precious a thing to permit its devaluation by living pointlessly, emptily, without meaning, without love, and finally, without hope.
—Vaclov Havel

God reveals as never before in such particularity as the one on our side! God with us. Not before or behind us. Not hovering around or even supporting us underneath. God with us is the human face of the divine, living in earthly years. Most of all, God reveals the power now available in all of us. Vaclov Havel, the author of this piece on hope, died this week right before Christmas. In my life, Havel was a contemporary incarnation of “hope.” In the midst of turmoil and conflict, internment and revolution, he gathered people together underground, built hope in those small groups, created a critical mass and rose up against the evil force. He saved a country, and lived to teach and write to help others do the same thing. I am eternally grateful for the words he spoke when he said “hope is an orientation of the spirit.” It is a phrase I have repeated to myself many times. With the birth of Jesus, the ancient world learned that in the midst of pagan influences and Gods who ruled but never included the human form, there was a power that celebrated the uniqueness of each person as the human reflection of the Creator. It’s time to give thanks for the Mother of Jesus who risked ridicule to live to Her belief, to Jesus and to the Vaclov Havels of our day – the bearers of hope!

Tanya V. Beck

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

All Saints Walks to End Homelessness


Last night members of All Saints participated in the annual Homeward Bound walk to raise awareness and funds to end homelessness in Indianapolis. The walk was on a rainy December night, and helped remind walkers of the conditions homeless residents of our city face every day. Team All Saints raised $310, which will be divided evenly between the Dayspring Center, a shelter for homeless families with children, and Horizon House, a day center that connects our homeless neighbors with services (as well as clean socks -- don't forget to leave new sock donations in the back of the church).

A big thank you to our walkers -- Lance Ratliff, Patricia Griffin, Tricia Clark and her grandsons -- and to Mary-Elise Haug for organizing the team.

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving from the clergy and vestry of All Saints!


Why do Americans celebrate Thanksgiving Day? (via christiananswers.net)

We can trace this historic American Christian tradition to the year 1623. After the harvest crops were gathered in November 1623, Governor William Bradford of the 1620 Pilgrim Colony, “Plymouth Plantation” in Plymouth, Massachusetts proclaimed:

"All ye Pilgrims with your wives and little ones do gather at the Meeting House, on the hill… there to listen to the pastor, and render Thanksgiving to the Almighty God for all His blessings."

This is the origin of our annual Thanksgiving Day celebration. Congress of the United States has proclaimed National Days of Thanksgiving to Almighty God many times throughout the following years. On November 1, 1777, by order of Congress, the first National Thanksgiving Proclamation was proclaimed, and signed by Henry Laurens, President of Continental Congress. The third Thursday of December, 1777 was thus officially set aside:

"…for solemn thanksgiving and praise. That with one heart and one voice the good people may express the grateful feelings of their hearts, and consecrate themselves to the service of their Divine Benefactor;… and their humble and earnest supplication that it may please God, through the merits of Jesus Christ, mercifully to forgive and blot them (their manifold sins) out of remembrance… That it may please Him… to take schools and seminaries of education, so necessary for cultivating the principles of true liberty, virtue and piety under His nurturing hand, and to prosper the means of religion for the promotion and enlargement of that kingdom which consisteth of 'righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy Ghost'…"

Then again, on January 1, 1795, our first United States President, George Washington, wrote his famed National Thanksgiving Proclamation, in which he says that it is…

"…our duty as a people, with devout reverence and affectionate gratitude, to acknowledge our many and great obligations to Almighty God, and to implore Him to continue is… our duty as a people, with devout reverence and affectionate gratitude, to acknowledge our many and great obligations to Almighty God, and to implore Him to continue and confirm the blessings we experienced…"

Thursday, the 19th day of February, 1795 was thus set aside by George Washington as a National Day of Thanksgiving.

Many years later, on October 3, 1863, Abraham Lincoln proclaimed, by Act of Congress, an annual National Day of Thanksgiving "on the last Thursday of November, as a day ofThanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the heavens." In thisThanksgiving proclamation, our 16th President says that it is…

"…announced in the Holy Scriptures and proven by all history, that those nations are blessed whose God is the Lord… But we have forgotten God. We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us, and we have vainly imagined, by the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own… It has seemed to me fit and proper that God should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged, as with one heart and one voice, by the whole American people…"

So it is that on Thanksgiving Day each year, Americans give thanks to Almighty God for all His blessings and mercies toward us throughout the year.



Thanksgiving Day Prayer from the Book of Common Prayer (page 246)


Almighty and gracious Father, we give you thanks for the fruits of the earth in their season and for the labors of those who harvest them. Make us, we pray, faithful stewards of your great bounty, for the provision of our necessities and the relief of all who are in need, to the glory of your Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Sunday, November 13, 2011

Damien Center, Dayspring Center, and Homeward Bound (oh my!)

As Thanksgiving approaches and the weather gets colder, All Saints has three great ways to get involved in supporting our community:

Damien Center Ingathering


As we have done in the past, we will have a special Thanksgiving ingathering of food for the Damien Center's Coby Palmer Food Pantry. The Damien Center offers a variety of services for people living with AIDS, and All Saints has been a longtime partner. In addition to traditional Thanksgiving food items (canned ham, salmon, stuffing, gravy, mashed potatoes, canned vegetables, canned fruit, and dessert mixes), the Damien Center has also expressed a special need for personal hygiene items like toothpaste, soap, and shampoo. On Sunday, November 20, we will bring contributions up to the altar to be blessed before delivering them to the Damien Center.

Dayspring Center Blanket Collection


The Old Northside is working with the Dayspring Center to collect blankets and throws. The Dayspring Center is an emergency shelter for homeless families with children immediately to the south of the church. Blankets will be used to help keep families warm.

Homeward Bound Walk


If blankets aren't quite your thing, but you still want to support efforts to end homelessness in Indianapolis, then support the All Saints team in the Homeward Bound walk. The 1-mile walk starts at City Market at 5:30pm on Monday, December 19. And if it seems like that time might be a little dark and a little cold, that's part of the point. Team All Saints will be raising funds for the Dayspring Center and Horizon House, a homeless day shelter and service center. Join Team All Saints or make a contribution today.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

A Perpetual Witness


Hot Off the Presses!



For many years, Father Gordon Chastain has been working on a history of the parish.

He has finished 
A Perpetual Witness, A Story of Grace and All Saints 
and it has now been published. 

Copies are available for free to all members in good standing
as a gift from the Vestry and Centennial Committee. 

If you would like to assist in the cost of publication 
or desire to purchase the book, the cost is $40.
Checks should note A Perpetual Witness in the memo field.

Copies will be made available at church on Sunday and in the church office during the week.







Saturday, October 22, 2011

Photos from the 100th Anniversary & Rededication of All Saints Church

On Sunday, October 16, Bishop Cate Waynick joined rectors and associate clergy of All Saints, past and present, to rededicate the church building in celebration of the building's 100th anniversary. To evoke the atmosphere of the original dedication in 1911, our liturgy came from the 1892 Book of Common Prayer, and combined the rite of consecration of a church with a choral evensong.

Bishop Cate's sermon was a reflection on the term "liturgy", which is derived from the Greek liturgia. The word originally had a secular meaning, referring to a public work accomplished at private cost -- such as a bridge constructed by a caravan trader and left behind for public use. The redemption of the world through Jesus Christ is also a form of liturgia, Christ's incarnation and death coming at unknowable cost to the Holy Trinity. All Saints, too, stands as a space that for 100 years has welcomed generations of people, with a particular ministry to those rejected by church or society. The wide embrace hosted by our building is our gift from those 100 years ago who provided funded the building of All Saints church, and those today who continue to maintain, grow, and fund the church for generations we will never know.

Music for the evensong was provided by All Saints organist/choirmaster Mason Copeland and the choir of All  Saints church, in addition to guest organists Bruce Neswick and David Kazimir, and numerous friends of the All Saints choir.

Photos by Tim Jensen.

Bishop Cate knocks on the door with her crozier.
The procession into the church.

The Bishop rededicates the baptismal font, including the new copper bowl given in memory of Nancy Thompson.


The congregation listens to the comprehensive Old Testament lesson (1 Kings 8), read by former rector Gordon Chastain.


Bishop Cate's sermon.
The choir.

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

100 Hands Over All Saints


The sign in the yarn shop read, “I make pretty string.” For many that's true, but for the as many more the sign might read, “I make pretty useful string.” The Knitting Ministry at All Saints Episcopal Church followed the second sign. For the past year the knitters of All Saints have been working together to make 100 hands or 50 pair of mittens as their way of marking the 100th anniversary of the the church building.

For some in the group the idea of controlling four needles instead of the usual two seemed monumental and daunting, for some it was a chance to learn something new and was met with zeal and for some it was an opportunity to pick up a well worn pattern and revisit an, “old friend.”. A few in the group opted to make hats and scarves to go with the mittens. Together, in just a little more than a year mittens to fit everyone from infants, toddlers, children, women and men have appeared on the clothes lines that were strung from the beams of our parish hall. 100 Hands Over All Saints has been a colorful reminder of our congregation's zeal for caring for others.

The mittens have been a learning experience for many of our church and beyond. While some in the knitting ministry learned how to make cable patterns, or knit in the round, some learned the secret codes of the craft now knowing just exactly what SSK means in the pattern. A few visitors to our parish hall have spoken of how fun and meaningful it was to see the hands over their heads learning that they would begin to warm the hands and hearts of some folks in our community who would welcome them as the winter chill comes to Indianapolis.

These mittens are more than just, “pretty string,” they are labors of love and care and a witness to the long standing commitment that this parish has to offering a hand to those who need it. The mittens will be blessed during the offertory on October 30th and will be distributed to neighboring support agencies, Julian Center and Dayspring Center. The knitters are pleased to announce that there are now 55 pairs of mittens to share with the Julian and Dayspring Centers.

These 100 Hands Over All Saints have proven to be a reminder that God uses our hands as his own here on earth.

— Don Bryant


Thursday, October 6, 2011

One Person Can Still Make A Difference





By now you've heard of the death of Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple and the driving vision behind the personal computer you're using today, and the man who put the power of the internet into the hands of the average consumer with the introduction of the iMac.

Not to mention the iPod, iPhone, iPad, iTunes, Pixar, and the best operating system and personal computers in the world.

He was fired from the company he founded and returned in 1998 to an organization on the brink of bankruptcy. As he said, "Apple is like a ship with a hole in the bottom, leaking water and my job is to get the ship pointed in the right direction."

As I write this, Apple's market cap today is over $350 billion.

Steve felt that Apple stood at the intersection of technology and liberal arts, and that was what drove their designs and product lines. "We make things that we like to use," he often said. "Part of what made the Macintosh great was the people who were working on it were musicians, poets, artists, historians, zoologists, who also happened to be the best computer scientists in the world."

A lot of tributes are being paid online, in the press, on television and cable. People are going to individual Apple stores around the world and leaving personal messages and flowers.

All for an adopted kid who dropped out of college to pursue what he loved and not settle for the status quo.

So the next time you think that you alone can't make a difference in your home, work, neighborhood, or church—think again.

Or as Mr. Jobs said, "Think Different."

Famous Stanford Commencement Speech

iTunes on Windows

Think Different




Tuesday, September 20, 2011


JOURNEY IN FAITH SERIES — REVISED


SESSION 6: PRACTICES OF FAITH:
SYMBOLISM IN LITURGY

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Presented by Fr. Tom Honderich and Mark Gastineau

Worship in the Episcopal Church is rich in symbolism that manifests both in visual images and in liturgical action. We will explain our liturgy and major symbols, and how they connect to life and experience.


NEW DATE!!
SESSION 7: PRACTICES OF FAITH: THE SACRAMENTS 
7 WAYS OF TOUCHING GOD

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Presented by Fr. Tom Honderich and The Rev. Amy Bailey

Two major sacraments, Eucharist and Baptism, are celebrated with regularity and solemnity. What does that mean? What is all the “hocus pocus” about? What is “real presence?” How and why is it significant?

NEW DATE!!
SESSION 8: PRACTICES OF FAITH:
THE POWER OF PERSONAL PRAYER 
AND HEALING
Sunday, November 13, 2011

Presented by The Rev. Canon Tanya Vonnegut Beck and Fr. Gordon Chastain

For some, prayer is about speaking with God; for others, prayer begins in stillness. How can we broaden our understanding and practice of prayer and enrich our communion with God?


SESSION 9: PRACTICES OF FAITH:
THE MINISTRIES OF THE CHURCH
Sunday, November 20, 2011

Presented by Fr. Dan Billman and 
The Rev. Karen Sullivan

The Church functions as a haven for the broken, a source of empowerment in the community, addresses issues of human rights and justice, and supports us in times of desperation and celebration.


SESSION 10: THE ANGLICAN COMMUNION

Sunday, January 8, 2012

Presented by The Right Rev. Cate Waynick

How did the Episcopal Church come to be a part of the Anglican Communion, and what is our relationship to the Archbishop of Canterbury and the 70 million Anglicans worldwide today?


SESSION 11: ANGLICAN POLITY

Sunday, January 22, 2012

Presented by The Very Rev. Gray Lesesne 
and Brendan O’Sullivan-Hale

The national Episcopal Church is currently at odds with Canterbury, over the consecration of both gay and lesbian bishops and female bishops. What are the politics and how does the Episcopal Church differ in its polity from the rest of the Anglican Communion?


SESSION 12: THE HISTORY OF ALL SAINTS

Sunday, February 12, 2012

Presented by Fr. Gordon Chastain

We are celebrating the 100th anniversary of our building this year and soon our 150th anniversary as a parish. Our history is checkered, cheeky, and often amusing. Knowing who we are helps us to understand why we do what we do and what we can be in the world in this new century.

Monday, July 18, 2011

JOURNEY IN FAITH SERIES — REVISED


SESSION 1: WHAT ARE YOU SEEKING?

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Presented by the Rev. Canon Tanya Beck 
and Fr. Tom Honderich

The invitation to this Journey in Faith meets and helps us reflect on where we are, what works for us (and what does not work for us,) and where we are going spiritually.


SESSION 2: WHO IS JESUS?

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Presented by Dr. Clark Williamson

Professor Emeritus, CTS

Who do you say He is? The core of the Christian faith is bound in the person of Jesus. Is Jesus the only path to God?How can we appreciate the insights of other great faiths while maintaining our own Christian integrity?


SESSION 3: THE HOLY SPIRIT: THE GIVER OF LIFE AND THE INSPIRATION OF THE CHURCH

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Presented by The Rev. Amy Bailey

Who is The Holy Spirit and how is The Holy Spirit related to the other persons of the Trinity? What is the importance of the Spirit in understanding the faith?


SESSION 4: THE BIBLE

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Presented by The Rev. Dr. John Rumple

The central document of the Christian faith is sometimes misused and misunderstood, yet is one of the most inspiring and enlightening statements of humankind’s attempt to find God. Where did it come from and why is it so important to Christians?


SESSION 5: PRACTICES OF FAITH: 
PUBLIC PRAYER AND 
THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Presented by The Rev. Steven Giovangelo

The Book of Common Prayer is one of the most beautiful examples of common piety and prayer written. We will explore its content, trace its evolution and contemplate its future.


SESSION 6: PRACTICES OF FAITH:
SYMBOLISM IN LITURGY

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Presented by Fr. Tom Honderich and Mark Gastineau

Worship in the Episcopal Church is rich in symbolism that manifests both in visual images and in liturgical action. We will explain our liturgy and major symbols, and how they connect to life and experience.


SESSION 7: PRACTICES OF FAITH: THE SACRAMENTS
7 WAYS OF TOUCHING GOD
Sunday, October 16, 2011

Presented by Fr. Tom Honderich and The Rev. Amy Bailey

Two major sacraments, Eucharist and Baptism, are celebrated with regularity and solemnity. What does that mean? What is all the “hocus pocus” about? What is “real presence?” How and why is it significant?


SESSION 8: PRACTICES OF FAITH:
THE POWER OF PERSONAL PRAYER 
AND HEALING
Sunday, November 6, 2011

Presented by The Rev. Canon Tanya Vonnegut Beck

For some, prayer is about speaking with God; for others, prayer begins in stillness. How can we broaden our understanding and practice of prayer and enrich our communion with God?


SESSION 9: PRACTICES OF FAITH:
THE MINISTRIES OF THE CHURCH

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Presented by Fr. Dan Billman and 
The Rev. Karen Sullivan

The Church functions as a haven for the broken, a source of empowerment in the community, addresses issues of human rights and justice, and supports us in times of desperation and celebration.


SESSION 10: THE ANGLICAN COMMUNION

Sunday, January 8, 2012

Presented by The Right Rev. Cate Waynick

How did the Episcopal Church come to be a part of the Anglican Communion, and what is our relationship to the Archbishop of Canterbury and the 70 million Anglicans worldwide today?


SESSION 11: ANGLICAN POLITY

Sunday, January 22, 2012

Presented by The Very Rev. Gray Lesesne 
and Brendan O’Sullivan-Hale

The national Episcopal Church is currently at odds with Canterbury, over the consecration of both gay and lesbian bishops and female bishops. What are the politics and how does the Episcopal Church differ in its polity from the rest of the Anglican Communion?


SESSION 12: THE HISTORY OF ALL SAINTS

Sunday, February 12, 2012

Presented by Fr. Gordon Chastain

We are celebrating the 100th anniversary of our building this year and soon our 150th anniversary as a parish. Our history is checkered, cheeky, and often amusing. Knowing who we are helps us to understand why we do what we do and what we can be in the world in this new century.

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Journey in Faith Series begins July 10, 2011


SESSION 1: WHAT ARE YOU SEEKING?


Sunday, July 10, 2011 
The invitation to this Journey in Faith meets and helps us reflect on where we are, what works for us (and what does not work for us,) and where we are going spiritually.

SESSION 2: WHO IS JESUS?

Sunday, July 24, 2011
Who do you say He is? The core of the Christian faith is bound in the person of Jesus. Is Jesus the only path to God?How can we appreciate the insights of other great faiths while maintaining our own Christian integrity?

SESSION 3: THE HOLY SPIRIT: THE GIVER OF LIFE AND THE INSPIRATION OF THE CHURCH

Wednesday, August 17, 2011 — 6:30 pm
Who is The Holy Spirit and how is The Holy Spirit related to the other persons of the Trinity? What is the importance of the Spirit in understanding the faith?

SESSION 4: THE BIBLE

Sunday, August 21, 2011
The central document of the Christian faith is sometimes misused and misunderstood, yet is one of the most inspiring and enlightening statements of humankind’s attempt to find God. Where did it come from and why is it so important to Christians?

SESSION 5: PRACTICES OF FAITH: 
PUBLIC PRAYER AND 
THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER

Sunday, September 11, 2011
The Book of Common Prayer is one of the most beautiful examples of common piety and prayer written. We will explore its content, trace its evolution and contemplate its future.

SESSION 6: PRACTICES OF FAITH:
SYMBOLISM IN LITURGY

Sunday, October 2, 2011
Worship in the Episcopal Church is rich in symbolism that manifests both in visual images and in liturgical action. We will explain our liturgy and major symbols, and how they connect to life and experience.

SESSION 7: PRACTICES OF FAITH: THE SACRAMENTS
7 WAYS OF TOUCHING GOD
Sunday, October 16, 2011
Two major sacraments, Eucharist and Baptism, are celebrated with regularity and solemnity. What does that mean? What is all the “hocus pocus” about? What is “real presence?” How and why is it significant?

SESSION 8: PRACTICES OF FAITH:
THE POWER OF PERSONAL PRAYER 
AND HEALING

Sunday, November 6, 2011
For some, prayer is about speaking with God; for others, prayer begins in stillness. How can we broaden our understanding and practice of prayer and enrich our communion with God?

SESSION 9: PRACTICES OF FAITH:
THE MINISTRIES OF THE CHURCH

Sunday, November 20, 2011
The Church functions as a haven for the broken, a source of empowerment in the community, addresses issues of human rights and justice, and supports us in times of desperation and celebration.

SESSION 10: THE ANGLICAN COMMUNION

Sunday, January 8, 2012 
How did the Episcopal Church come to be a part of the Anglican Communion, and what is our relationship to the Archbishop of Canterbury and the 70 million Anglicans worldwide today?

SESSION 11: ANGLICAN POLITY

Sunday, January 22, 2012
The national Episcopal Church is currently at odds with Canterbury, over the consecration of both gay and lesbian bishops and female bishops. What are the politics and how does the Episcopal Church differ in its polity from the rest of the Anglican Communion?

SESSION 12: THE HISTORY OF ALL SAINTS

Sunday, February 12, 2012
We are celebrating the 100th anniversary of our building this year and soon our 150th anniversary as a parish. Our history is checkered, cheeky, and often amusing. Knowing who we are helps us to understand why we do what we do and what we can be in the world in this new century.

Unless indicated, all sessions are held immediately following the coffee hour in the Parish Hall.

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Vestry meeting rescheduled to July 5

Due to travel schedule conflicts, the Vestry meeting originally scheduled for June 20 has been rescheduled to July 5 at 6:30pm in the parish office. As always, visitors are most welcome.

Thursday, June 2, 2011

Thoughts on Ascension

We observed Ascension, one of the more obscure feast days of the Christian church this evening. This day we mark the ascent of the risen Jesus into heaven.

Ascension marks the second time Jesus leaves his followers behind. The first time is Good Friday, followed by his total absence on Holy Saturday. This time he leaves his disciples desolate, uncertain of the future, Peter probably wondering if he was right to deny Jesus.

The second time is when Jesus leaves following his resurrection. This time he leaves his disciples hopeful, but with great responsibility. It is their task - and ours, as their spiritual descendants - to be the Body of Christ, to be the representative of Jesus on earth.

Jesus tells us: my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. But a yoke is a yoke no matter how easy, and a burden is a burden no matter how light. How are we, both as All Saints, and as individuals, meeting the task of being his people in the world?


Monday, May 30, 2011

A Collect for Memorial Day

While you enjoy the beautiful weather this holiday, take a moment to give thanks for those members of our armed forces who have given their lives and those who risk them today.

A collect for heroic service (p. 839, Book of Common Prayer):

O Judge of the nations, we remember before you with grateful hearts the men and women of our country who in the day of decision ventured much for the liberties we now enjoy. Grant that we may not rest until all the people of this land share the benefits of true freedom and gladly accept its disciplines.





Sunday, May 22, 2011

Search Committee Starts its Work

This past Monday, the Search Committee began in its search for a new rector. The initial meeting included Canon Debra Kissinger, who helps parishes in transition, and Mary Strange, who will act as a coach to the search committee during the initial phases of the process. The committee is very excited to be starting its work, and asks for your support and prayers. The members of the committee are:

Don Bryant
Katie Day
Linda Ferreira (chair)
Brad King
Kevin Morgan
John Phillips
Helene Russell


The search process requires a great deal of trust and confidentiality. The committee is charged with bringing the vestry only one name, so the process is very deliberate as the committee discerns who will be the best fit as our next rector. Maintaining privacy for our candidates is also critical. Accordingly, while the committee is committed to keeping the parish informed about where they are in the process, at no time will the names of those being considered be discussed outside the committee.

The members of the committee have taken on a serious commitment as All Saints prepares to enter the next phase of our life together. Please keep them in your prayers.

Friday, April 22, 2011

Tweeting about the Resurrection

While Easter Vigil has been one of my favorite services of the year as long as I've been a Christian, there's always been something about it that feels like cheating. At the end of the service it's still dark, and the calendar still says it's Saturday. For all the service's mystery (beginning in darkness with the new fire, and recounting the history of human creation and salvation) and majesty (the sudden illumination of the altar, the masses of flowers, the dramatic organ fanfare and return of the Gloria), it also seems like it may be elaborate cover to get to the end of Lent a few hours early.

Last night, after the Maundy Thursday service, people signed up to keep watch in the Michael Chapel with the reserved sacrament, as a way of trying to connect to the experience of the disciples praying with Jesus in the garden before his betrayal. I signed up for the 4am slot.

I don't see 4am very often, so I was surprised that sitting in the chapel that the two sounds I noticed most were the FedEx jets flying overhead and the twittering birds. We all know that birds rouse themselves before dawn, but three hours before? I guess I knew that intellectually, but hadn't experienced it for a while.

So birds twitter in the dark, sure of the coming of the sun. And our celebration of Easter vigil is similar. We tweet in the dark, sure of the resurrection of the Lord, rejoicing while most others sleep.

The Great Vigil of Easter is this Saturday night at 9pm. The service lasts about two hours. A festive reception will follow in the back of the church. I hope you'll join us.

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Please Mark Your Calendars

Wednesday Masses in Lent
8 AM and 6 PM

THE SUNDAY OF THE PASSION: PALM SUNDAY
April 17, 10 AM

FORUM: SEARCH COMMITTEE ANNOUNCEMENT
April 17, 11:30 AM

MAUNDY THURSDAY
April 21, 6:30 PM

STATIONS OF THE CROSS
April 22, Noon

GOOD FRIDAY
April 22, 6:30 PM

LITURGY OF HOLY SATURDAY
April 23, 10 AM

GREAT VIGIL OF EASTER
April 23, 9 PM

EASTER DAY
April 24, 10 AM


Monday, April 4, 2011

Nancy Thompson Visitation and Service Times


Nancy Thompson
1932 - 2011

Friday, April 8, 2011
Visitation, 4 - 7 PM
All Saints Church

Saturday, April 9, 2011
Visitation, 9 AM
Requiem Mass, 10 AM
All Saints Church


All Saints Church
1559 Central Avenue
Indianapolis, IN 46202


Memorials
All Saints Building Fund
American Cancer Society



Sunday, April 3, 2011

Team Extreme Strikes a Pose




Acolytes serve the church by maintaining an atmosphere of reverent worship, but our acolyte teams form long-term bonds of friendship and fun through their monthly service on the altar.

Acolyte team D has renamed itself Team Extreme. In this photo Olivia Ross and Frank Smith demonstrate the team's (heretofore) secret X sign.

We're always looking for new acolytes. If you're interested in joining a team, contact Mark Gastineau.



Saturday, April 2, 2011

Michael Chapel Doors are In

Late last week, the restored doors in the Michael Chapel were finally installed. These old oak doors were re-hardened and restained, missing pieces were replaced, and new door hardware was fashioned. This was the latest project of the Cornerstone Capital campaign, preparing our physical property to provide spiritual sustenance for the next 100 years.















Thursday, March 31, 2011

Karen Sullivan at All Saints this Sunday





Want to see a great example of folks doing good in our community? Look no further than nearby St. Philip's Episcopal Church, whose food ministry serves over 100 hungry families every month.

This Sunday, the Rev. Karen Sullivan, deacon at St. Philip's, will be joining us for mass and for an after-church forum, where we can learn more about this valuable community service. All Saints parishioners have helped out with this ministry from time to time, most recently by sharing the proceeds of our annual yard sale with the food pantry.

We're excited to welcome Karen to All Saints to learn more about how we can partner to help the neediest in our community.

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Echoing Air Concert — April 1, 7:30 PM

As part of its Lenten series, Christ Church Cathedral presents Echoing Air, a vocal ensemble with baroque instruments.

The concert will feature works by Campian, Couperin, Frscobaldi, Humphrey, Maris, Purcell, Roe, Sch├╝tz Telemann Torelli.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

The Latest from the Friary by Steve Jamison

It's been a while since I informed AS what is up here. Things are going well. I have been very busy. I gave my first sermon the Sunday before Lent. It went well. I didn't get tomatoes thrown at me. Now I am working on "Day of Reflection" for April. We have these reflections once a month. My clothing date has been sent (aka receiving the habit or brown dress). It will be either May 19th or 20th. I forgot which it was. I will send an update when I get it confirmed. Things have picked since Lent started. We have groups coming in on the weekends number up to 40 people. It's lots of fun. Meeting new people. I have been doing a lot of baking bread. We bake about 90 loaves a week. I have been brave and have been driving around in the area. I am now trying to decide which drivers are worse, the ones here in NY or in Indy. That has been all thus far.

I do miss All Saints and all the people there. Tell all I said HI and keep me in your prayers.

Friday, March 11, 2011

Vestry Meetings rescheduled

The vestry normally meets on the third Monday of each month, but we've had to move some things around to accommodate travel schedules and the search process timeline.

The March meeting will be Monday, March 28 at 6:30pm in the parish hall.

The April meeting will be Monday, April 11 at 6:30pm in the parish hall.

We will resume our regular schedule in May.

Any member of the congregation is welcome to attend.


Search Committee Nominations Open Sunday, March 13

We will begin accepting nominations for the clergy search committee on Sunday. Nominations will remain open for four weeks. The search is an involved process, expected to last up to a year. During parts of the process, the committee will be meeting as often as once per week.

The clergy search process relies to a high degree on trust: trust in God to guide the process, and trust in those we charge to serve on the committee to work faithfully on behalf of the whole church. As you consider nominations, think of those in the parish with some of the following characteristics:

- Faithfulness in worship and prayer
- Good listening skills
- Respect for confidentiality
- Good organizational skills

A nomination sheet will be included in the worship bulletin beginning this week and for the next four weeks. Drop your nominations in the offering plate, or give them to a vestry member. The committee will begin its work after Easter.


Coins for Camp - thanks for your support!

The generosity of the congregation in supporting the Coins for Camp collection shows how far a little generosity can go. Rose Lane reports:

Your “pocket change” collected the last two Sundays totaled $271 that can be used to help send some of the younger members of our parish to Waycross for summer camp. Thank you so much for your generous giving. Waycross has a policy that no child shall be denied a camping experience as the result of financial needs; however, the amount of scholarships given always exceed the amount of the scholarship fund. As such, parishes are encouraged to help and I am proud to be able to say we can do that. There’s generally a 1/3 expectation when a scholarship is being requested: the family pays 1/3, the parish pays 1/3 and Waycross will cover the final 1/3. With our $271, we should be able to provide 1/3 of a week at Waycross to two children and perhaps three. If we don’t need to use the money for members of All Saints, the fund will be transferred to Waycross for its scholarship fund. If you have a child interested in attending Waycross this summer, there are camp brochures on the table in the back of the church. If you need to request some tuition assistance, please call the church office

Missing Painting Returns




This painting of the Madonna and Child was recently restored by Jean Easter of Easter Services and has now been returned to its place in the parish hall library. The restoration was generously funded by gifts from two parishioners.

Dayspring Center celebrates its 25th anniversary




Our neighbors at Dayspring Center will be in the church to celebrate their 25th anniversary on March 16 at 11am. Their mission humbly began as a feeding program and a place for the homeless to sleep on a pew. Today, 25 years later, they have become a full service agency, providing emergency assistance (food, clothing and safe shelter) and vital services to homeless families with children in central Indiana. To date, nearly 4,000 families, including over 12,000 children have found hope and a new beginning at Dayspring Center! Please join them at All Saints as they begin their next 25 years

Thursday, February 24, 2011

From Amy Bailey

The Rev. Canon Sally G. Bingham, leader of the Interfaith Power and Light movement will deliver a lecture entitled "Religion and the Environment" at Franklin College's Richardson Chapel on Thursday, March 3 at 7 p.m.

Bingham is the Canon for the Environment in the Diocese of California.The event is free and open to the public. Map and Directions

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Hello from Steve Jamison

Steve Jamison left us just a few weeks ago to start his new life with the brothers of the Society of St. Francis, an order of Franciscan monks within the Anglican Communion. He sends us this update:
Just keeping in touch with All Saints. I arrived to Society of St. Francis safely and was able to settle in great. I had my postulate ceremony last night. I am slowly getting used to the flow of things here and still have a lot to learn. I jumped right in on all fours and played the piano for the masses. I hope and pray that all at All Saints keep me in their prayers as my journey is beginning with the Brothers here at SSF. I miss All Saints and of course the organ. Tell all hi and I send my love. I keep All Saints in my prayers.

Coins for Camp Collection - Next Two Sundays



On Sunday, February 27 and March 6, a separate offering will be collected to benefit any of our children who would like to go to camp at Waycross this summer. We are asking that you deposit your pocket change in the metal collection containers on these two Sundays.

The Waycross policy is that no child desiring to attend camp will be turned away due to financial limitations; however, because there are so many requests for scholarships, Waycross does ask that the local parish contribute in some way. Our Sunday School has been growing and we might have some of our own who would like to spend a week at our Diocesan camp and conference center. If not, the monies will be sent to Waycross to be added to the general scholarship fund.

So, what’s the big deal about metal collection containers? We want to hear a lot of noise as you support the youth in our parish and our Diocese. Of course, that green money will be gladly accepted but we’re hoping for a lot of coins so that everyone knows we are beyond our youth. If your normally deposit your weekly change in a jar where it’s just sitting around collecting dust, please consider bringing it to church the next two Sundays and dropping it into our containers to support a good cause.

And, if you’re interested in the 2011 Summer Camp schedule, there will be brochures on the table at the back of the church.

Forum on the Transition Process this Sunday

The Vestry met Monday night with the Rev. Canon Debra Kissinger on Monday night to get a feel for the shape of the transition process. The Vestry's ready to go, but a successful search process will take a lot of help from a lot of people throughout the church. Learn more this Sunday in an educational forum led by the Vestry after mass. Bring your questions -- we might not have all the answers yet, but we'll do our best.

RSVP's aren't required, but we'd love it if you'll tell us you're coming on Facebook. And if you want to study up in advance, the written materials we'll be working from are included in the February 21 vestry minutes, posted on our web site.

Smithsonian Partners with the Episcopal Church in Haiti

We've been praying for the Episcopal Church in Haiti for months now, so it seems appropriate that when the church in Haiti makes the New York Times, we ought to let you know about it. Most of Trinity Cathedral's world-renowned murals depicting the life of Christ in a Haitian context were destroyed in last year's earthquake, but several survived, and the Episcopal Church and the Smithsonian institution are partnering to save them.
The effort to save the murals is a visible extension of a little-known cross-border bond. The Episcopal Church of Haiti was founded by an African-American named James Theodore Holly, who led about 2,000 black Americans to Haiti in 1861 as part of a wider emigration movement. He and his sons played prominent roles as professionals and scholars after founding “what was actually Haiti’s first national church, and the first Episcopal church founded outside of the Anglophone world,” said Laurent Dubois, a historian at Duke University.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Miss the Annual Meeting?




Whether the snow and ice kept you away, or if you were just distracted by the pizza - fear not! The minutes of the annual meeting are now on our web site. Find the meeting minutes, plus minutes of vestry meetings, sermons, and all kinds of other materials in our Archives section.

Thursday, February 17, 2011

A Message from the Bishop on this Sunday's Gospel

Dear Friends,
This Sunday we are presented with a lesson from Matthew’s gospel which is familiar to all of us and many of our members.  Some of the language in this lesson has worked its way into our vocabularies; “turn the other cheek,” and  “go an extra mile.” 
The problem is that what we mean by those phrases bears little or no resemblance to the original meaning, and in fact can completely obscure the lesson Jesus was offering his hearers.  I urge you to take this opportunity to set the record straight, and provide a teaching for our members which can help them embrace Jesus’ call to participate in doing justice and mercy.
The scholarly work for what I am offering you here was done by Walter Wink in his series of three books on the ‘powers of this world.’  One volume, entitled Engaging the Powers, gives an explanation of this teaching and what it meant when Jesus said it.  I had the privilege of hearing him offer this teaching in person – and it has stayed with me for lots of reasons.
The cultural context for this teaching is crucial to hold in mind; the people who were listening to Jesus took certain things for granted – understandings we do not share, and have completely lost over the centuries. 
The passage begins with Jesus saying once again, “you have heard……but I say to you.”  In this pattern he routinely tells them something which is more difficult than the original commandment – as in the lesson we had last week. 
The lex talionis – “eye for eye and tooth for tooth” was a law which limited the revenge response.  It permitted violence, but prohibited escalation of it.  No more was to be exacted than had been taken.  NO MORE than an eye for an eye, NO MORE than a tooth for a tooth.  What Jesus goes on to say to them is that no violence is permitted.  They are to be wise, non-violent, and yet effective by using the cultural norms and rules to their advantage.

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

A Centennial Valentine


Last Sunday, the Sunday school class celebrated Valentine's Day by giving everyone in the church a Valentine. In honor of our 100th anniversary, the Valentine design features 100 hearts.

Acolytes to be Commissioned this Sunday

This Sunday between the confession and the Peace, we'll be commissioning our acolyte team. Mark Gastineau writes:

On Sunday, the acolytes will be commissioned during Mass. We have not done this for a couple of years. It is important for two reasons: to remind us of the solemn duty we have taken on to serve God at the altar, and to show the congregation how many devoted acolytes there are in this parish. No rehearsal is necessary! We will simply gather in the crossing for the brief rite. I hope you will all be there.

Many thanks to all of you for your remarkable, selfless service as Acolytes. Every man, woman, and child in this parish says the liturgy is the most important thing to them, and YOU are vital in allowing them to make that assertion!


Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Change of Address: All Saints has Relocated to Antarctica


Ok, we're still at 16th and Central, but the church is surrounded by a sheet of ice. Due to the hazardous conditions in the parking areas and sidewalks around the church, we are asking people NOT to come to the church until the snow removal team has had the chance to remove the ice and salt the affected areas.

Mass on Wednesday, 2/2 and Choir Rehearsal on Thursday, 2/3 are both cancelled.

Saturday morning choir rehearsal, Sunday morning mass, and the annual meeting will all take place as scheduled.

Please stay safe!

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Weather Alert 2/2/2011







Due to the ice storm, the Wednesday evening service is cancelled. Please be careful outside!

Sunday, January 30, 2011

All Saints Commissions Sunday School Teachers


At this morning's service, we commissioned our Sunday School teachers, the devoted volunteers who educate the children of our parish in the Christian faith, repeating a passage from Deuteronomy 11:

The words which I command you this day shall be upon your hearts; and you shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise. We will recount to generations to come the praiseworthy deeds and the power of the Lord, and the wonderful works he has done.


Tanya reminded the group that the work they do today is formative for the young lives they influence. Be sure to thank our Sunday School teachers for their service: Ginger Biddinger, Barbara Geer, Susan Thompson, Ann Thompson-Brock, and Jim Tomlinson.

Monday, January 24, 2011

Verna "Verne" DeWalt Lewis: May 24, 1934 - January 13, 2011

Verna Lewis, a longtime member of All Saints, has died. Services will be held at Lavenia, Smith and Summers Home for Funerals at 5811 E. 38th St.

Calling will be from 11-1 on Wednesday, January 26. The funeral will follow at 1pm.

May Verna's soul, and the souls of all the departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace.

Visioning Council Report 2011

Please present your thoughts. This will be discussed at the Annual Meeting on February 6, 2011.

Visioning Council Report
January, 2011

The Visioning Group called together by Tanya in the summer of 2010 began its work with personal stories of the impact of the parish on our own lives and the lives of others. Many of the stories centered around one or more of three themes – a welcoming and safe place for wounded persons of all sorts and conditions, the historic and pivotal role of the parish in response to societal issues, and magnificent and meaningful worship. Those themes were encapsulated in the adoption of a vision statement:

We believe
… that something special happens to us when we worship God
… in building upon our extraordinary history as a beacon for social concerns
… in welcoming people without exception.

A concrete result of that belief in worship and welcome was the suggestion to move the Baptismal Font, the symbol of welcome into the household of faith, to its new position at the head of center aisle as one enters the main doors.

On January 12, 2011, Tanya called the group back together to deal with the question of “what next?” Again we told stories about times since this visioning process began when worship has resonated with us, about when we have been beacons of concern or witnessed such beacons, and about welcoming. The group also attempted to define “social concern” – with “concern” suggesting what God lays on our hearts as a call to response and with “social” suggesting systemic societal issues. The group’s conversation soon identified a systemic, societal issue weighing heavily on our hearts – namely, the fear-based anger and selfish rage of our culture illustrated in everything from road rage to political attack to media frenzy. What could All Saints do about that? We quickly identified both things that we are doing constructively and suggestions for ways we could move forward in doing more. Current activity and future directions could be seen under the following headings:


  1. Telling stories – continuing to share vignettes from our own lives illustrating the power of unity over division, hope over despair, reaching out over selfishness, etc.
  2. Setting up a “school for the times” – offering help and training in and opportunities to practice meditation, prayer, theological reflection and a wide variety of other spiritual resources; and identifying and offering training in techniques for how to talk to others about difficult and divisive things.
  3. Facilitating for a wider public conversations about difficult and divisive things using formats and techniques which offer safety from attack.
  4. Partnering across ethnic, cultural, economic, racial, and religious divides to accomplish the above objectives.
  5. Establishing a structure in the parish which would focus on and facilitate these objectives.